Surface Pro 2 Review

Note: I originally wrote this past last November, but for some reason never published it. As we’re so close to Surface Pro 3 launch time, I thought it worthwhile to publish this now and reminisce.

Disclaimer: I work for Microsoft, but did not and do not work directly on any of the Surface projects. My opinions are my own, but obviously shaped by my experiences at the company.

When the first generation Surface Pro was launched, you could see the vision laid out before the device pretty clearly. It was supposed to be the most performance one could reasonably pack into an ultra-mobile form factor, for on-the-go power users. Unfortunately, those on-the-go power users also needed the ability to actually be on-the-go. The approximately 4 (maybe 5) hours of productive battery life from that device were too few to be able to take full advantage of the mobility factor.

Fast forward not quite a year and we saw the potential of Haswell, not in pushing the performance envelope, but rather the power consumption one. Packing that update into what was otherwise a great device would make Surface Pro 2 a more complete realization of the original vision. At launch, the Surface Pro 2 was touted to have 75% better battery life than v1. Compared to the 4-5 hours of real world battery life in v1, you’d expect somewhere in the 7-8.5 hour range with v2.

Early reviews came close to that range, CNET and The Verge hitting 7-7.5 hours, but Engadget and AnandTech were down closer to the 6.5 hour range. While not bad, it certainly wasn’t up to par (battery life/wh capacity) to some of the better Ultrabook-class machines. Shortly after launch, a firmware update was released to address some power consumption bugs. Anand’s since run some additional testing, showing web browsing is now up to 8.3 hours. My daily use also bears the improved battery life out. In a domain-joined, heavily saturated wireless environment at work, battery report (cmd: powercfg /batteryreport on Windows 8+) shows that I’ve been getting on average 7.5 hours out of a full charge. That’s just about all-(working)-day battery life.

At one point, I questioned the choice of the Haswell-U (15W TDP) processor line for this type of form factor. After all, the higher power consumption part would require more cooling, a bigger battery and thus make the device thicker and heavier than if it were otherwise equipped with, say, a Haswell-Y part. However, with the story all told and the support of the accessory line up, it’s clear the goal was to create a unique device, capable of being your main productivity machine in the smallest reasonable form factor. Compared with something like the Sony Tap 11, which uses a Haswell-Y processor, the Surface is 0.3lbs heavier and 3.5mm thicker, but it lasts much longer on battery and performs significantly better, even when comparing the ~$1000-1100 SKUs. This is intended to be mobile enough to do everything you need to on the go, but then dock seamlessly into a desktop environment.

I’ve been using the Surface Pro 2 for long enough at both work and home to have a good read of where it shines and scenarios where it needs improvement. The short of it is that I’ve been sufficiently impressed that I’m considering buying myself one as a Christmas present. 🙂

All the basics and critical bases are covered. The display is a nice, crisp, and color-accurate 1080p 10.6″ one. Battery life, as previously mentioned is in the 7.5 hour-range, sufficient for a day of meetings or an intercontinental flight without a charger. Performance is always snappy, little to no hiccups. Wifi connectivity is up to good laptop class, with a 2x2n dual band solution. The new two-stage kickstand is welcomed for both in-lap usage and while standing at the kitchen counter. Type Cover 2’s backlit keys are useful in dim settings and the key actions are a bit nicer, a bit quieter than Type Cover v1. Lastly, while I’ve always felt styli are a bit gimmicky when it comes to interfaces, I’m loving the pen+OneNote. I’m not using even 10% of the pen and digitizer’s capabilities; however, diagrams while note taking and OCR for pen-to-character conversion with OneNote is a “wow” scenario. I really wish I had this thing while I was in university. Oh, and I almost forgot, the thing has a fan, but it’s so quiet, I’ve not heard it spin up. It’s one of those things that’s best not noticed.

Okay, but there are areas for improvement.

My first piece of feedback not so much a feasible “improvement”, but rather a fundamental change to the device: the screen size. The 10.6″ form factor makes a near full-sized keyboard a possibility, which is great, but with so much horsepower and potential, I want to use it as my only productivity machine, on the go. The screen size is cramped, especially when you’re trying to write a document while referencing a source in a web browser, for example. It’s a natural trade-off for an ultra mobile device, but nevertheless, limiting when it comes to serious productivity on the move. With the docking station and external monitors at a desk, it can really stretch its legs.

My second concern is pricing, or rather the configurations available for sale. The $999 SKU comes with 4GB RAM and 128GB of storage. I don’t particularly care to upgrade to more storage (plus, it comes with 200GB of SkyDrive for two years!); however, I would like more than 4GB memory. Unfortunately, you cannot have one without the other and the associated $300 adder. That said, after including a Type Cover, the Surface Pro 2 ends up being approximately $100 more than an equivalently spec’d MacBook Air 11, but adds a higher resolution touchscreen and is more versatile (tablet mode, pen).

Lastly, while the Type Cover 2 is generally an improvement over v1, I do miss the first gen’s touchpad, which had both a slicker surface and a depressible click mechanism. In both cases, I wish there was more space for a larger touchpad. Especially given the small display compared to more laptops, precision tasks (e.g. placing the cursor in Word) are challenging with the touchscreen and made only marginally better by the small touchpad. Alas, next gen.

So, the thing is certainly not perfect, and in particular, the small and relatively stubby form factor makes it look and feel like an oddly dense tablet, that isn’t quite large enough to replace most folks’ laptops, with keyboard attached. However, it’s getting mighty close with the battery life and stand angle issues solved. For me and my use cases, I find the combination pretty ideal as a program manager, at work, and I’ve been using it as my primary machine there.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *